Home Programme Description Study region Publications Publication: Ambio Special Issue 2015 People Calendarium
 

Ekoklim is organised into four reseach themes:

Ecosystem services

Ecosystem services are being included in societal decision-making and many projects worldwide aim to improve environmental management by providing incentives to increase the supply of specific services. However, most efforts have been focused on improving the provision of single or small groups of ecosystem services, e.g., carbon sequestration, without considering how changes in management alters the dynamics of other ecosystem services, such as water quality or pollination. Because ecosystems simultaneously produce multiple services, changes in ecological functioning usually affect more than one service. How these bundles of ecosystem services change over time and space is not well understood. Such knowledge would help identifying critical ecological interactions, avoiding dangerous or unwanted declines in ecosystem services, and identifying opportunities to synergistically enhance multiple ecosystem services.

A necessary tool for evaluating trade-offs and for managing ecosystem services in a changing climate, particularly those services related to biodiversity, is a model that mechanistically connects external drivers, biodiversity and specific services. A natural basis for such a model is traits, rather than taxonomic identity. Species traits, and trait distributions within communities, are the outcomes of evolutionary and species sorting processes such as natural selection and species interactions. Trait distributions are therefore labile to external drivers such as climates or management. Recognizing these connections and tradeoffs will allow us to provide better management guidelines.

Main goals

(i) To develope trait-based approaches as a bridge between biodiversity responses and ecosystem services
Contact: Prof Jon Norberg

(ii) To evaluate ecosystem service trade-offs in empirical studies and in coupled social-ecological models as a bridge between landscape processes, ecosystem services and adaptive governance.
Contact: Prof Garry Peterson

 

Ecosystem services
Contact: Prof Jon Norberg
Department of Systems Ecology